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20121201
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and join the peace corps, volunteered in the inner city or in outer space because he asked them to give back to this country that has given us all so much. generation inspired has passed that commitment on to their children and grandchildren in the continuity of spirit that continues to work for a more just and peaceful world. as we approached the 50th anniversary, my family thought a good deal about how to best celebrate my father service and patriotism. we recognize that his time is becoming part of history. not living memory. that brings opportunities as well as challenges. both my parents loved history and and they pass it on to me to my brother, john. my father read voraciously about the civil war, english parliamentary history and the world wars of the 20th century. my mother preferred the ancient world in 18th century europe. for them come in the past was not a tie and a welfare. but full of exciting people, rate heroes and heroines, and defense that could teach us a great deal about our own times. here at the library we decided to concentrate on making history of the kennedy adm
on the city of goma, the people of north seventh street and citizens everywhere wonder when the storm has passed our rebels before the superstar. either way, tell tell signs in history indicate that the conflict will continue unless appropriate deterring measures are taken. m23 at its precursor exposed congo as a dysfunctional state but we put up a leadership and lacking a combatant army and security institutions. but the feeling of the state, all community grievances, demographic, ethnic expansion and control of resources has turned eastern congo into a tinderbox. this means ambitious ashburn in recent demagogues only need to cause and find a sponsor can be a communitycome the business can the political state to start the militia. m23, primarily √Čtude d. mono ethnic armed group fighting discrimination is one reason for the rebellion. they failed to generate important political communities such as the onion malindi who have so far refused to join m23. instead, serving the drc army and fighting the rebellion. the rebellion had also tried to take over goma can deliver to the drc. it is whe
fractured civil war and the israeli incursion of 1982. the city was a mess. the school is under assault. he believed that going back and running the school and providing leadership at a time of crisis was the best thing to do for an institution that is loved and he gave his life to the school was assassinated in january of 9094. >> by who and how? >> most likely by the fanatical wing of hezbollah, a group known as islamist jihads the comprised lebanese shia who had historically been underprivileged, excluded from the politics and economics of the country, had ideological affinity for the regime in iran, from 1979 and have been radical in the israeli purge to lebanon in the 1980s. there is a very toxic mix that let them should make steps the climax of the assassination of malcolm kerr. >> was he targeted? >> because he was an american. not only american, but very visible presence in the middle east. there is no more high-profile example of america's involvement in the region in the presence of uav. >> this american university put in beirut on purpose? back in 1850s, what was beirut like? >>
'malley with the insistence we were ready -- we were ready and resilient. we all said -- punishment on ocean city. that protected $2 billion worth of property because we spend public money to protect private property. that worked. but now we're in to the recovery phase and this, and the response was great. we had heroic people. we were hit by a hurricane, on the shore and coming up our bay all the way to the inner harbor of the port of baltimore and hit by the blizzard in the western part of our state, which is the appalachians. we needed the national guard to respond. we had state troopers and other emergency responders on snow mobiles going in to take care of the elderly and get them out to safety. we did all of that. so now here we are. and now i'm going to just quick word about the shore. you heard what they said. [inaudible] rich in tradition and pride. hard working in -- [inaudible] hit by diesel fuel hit by what they consider unfair government. cash poor, community spirit, my question, and unemployment rate in that area that is in among the highest in the state, think of boot more baltimor
plantation. there were no villages and towns and cities in the north. in the north people could free slaves with opportunities in manufacturing where they could learn skills and trades. couldn't do that in the south. the only opportunity for work or for field hands and when the cotton gin was invented, and that absorbed all the slaves unskilled laborer and you now have i plantation owner, this rather cruel lower middle income people buying property in planting cotton prior to that, most of the poor whites in the south were against slavery because the slaves competed with them for jobs. but unlike most politicians come he put his political career on the line in favor of abolition. >> he was the first to stand up and he led the fight turned his congressional career, which really began after his presidency. he failed to be really did to the presidency. you brought this up before because he didn't have the common touch. he believed it was the need for dignity of a presidential candidate to go stumping out in the countryside and make promises to people he knew he couldn't keep and unfortunately
it is steve inskeep. cohost of npr's morning edition. his first book, "instant city: life and death in karachi." he joins us here at the national book festival. if you would like to hear him come out we will be webcasting his event for one of the tents here at the national book festival later this afternoon. you can watch that i booktv.org. the full schedule of live coverage on the web and on c-span2 is available at booktv.org. .. c-span: justice sandra day o'connor, why a book about the lazy b? >> guest: basically, because my brother and i grew up on the lazy b ranch, and it ended up being sold in the late 1980s, and it broke my heart. something that i thought would always be part of me and part of our family and always there for my children and grandchildren and their children was gone, and there wasn't any other way to preserve it, i guess, except to sit down and see if we can write up some of those memories and make it real. c-span: when--when did you start writing it? >> guest: oh, about three years ago. for a long time, it was so painful that the ranch was gone that i couldn't let myself
of the southwest and others show that this has blighted development in our towns and cities. the proposal for my colleagues, that we create a long grace. for newly completed buildings, it is a sensible one. and we will introduce it next october. the previous government also plans to increase the small companies tax rates 22%, and we have cut it to 20%. unlike the small and medium-size firms, i want to thank my honorable friend for their help in this area. starting on the first of january and for the next two years. i am therefore going to increase by 10 fold in the annual investment allowance in machinery. instead of 25,000 pounds worth of investment being eligible for 100% relief, 250,000 pounds are not qualified. [cheers] this capital loans will cover cover the total investment undertaken by 99% of all of the business in britain. it is a huge thing to all those who run the business to aspire to grow and expand and create jobs. mr. speaker, i also want britain to have the most competitive tax regime of any major economy in the world. i have already cut the main rates from 20% to 24%, and is exp
a free city protected by the western powers. in 1958, there was an ultimatum. the west had to be out of berlin in six months or else. this was a crisis, the gravest crisis of the cold war up to that point. the prez -- the press, congress, and the administration thought if meant war. we needed resolve to beef up the troops' strength and defy the red army. meeting privately with the leaders, president eisenhower said we're not going to do that. indeed, he said, we're cutting forces in germany by 50,000 men. his advisers and the congressmen bewildered. cut the troop strength? won't that show weakness? ike was all alone and heavily criticized in the press. he seemed utterly unphased. eisenhower had a great capacity to take responsibility. he may have seen that famous photograph taken of ike on the eve of d-day in june 1944. general eisenhower, the supreme allied commander, wearing normal uniform, talking to a group of paratroopers, geared up, faces blackened, ready to jump mind german lines. ike came to see the men because he was told they were not likely to come back. the airborne assau
'm not a marxist, but class wise. and it's very true. i remember growing up in chandler, arizona, a city of about 12,000. and my dad was a ranch foreman on a cattle ranch. didn't make a ton of money, and yet somehow he provided for my mother, my college education, insurance. i don't know how he did it. but i looked across the street at another very middle class family. i looked across the street diagonally, and one of the richest families in chandler lived there, and the lot next to them was their pool and their poolhouse. who's a guest at their pool every single week? me. who plays monopoly with their kids? me. you don't see that much anymore. the superzips, as murray calls them, are highly i insulated and rarely get middle america at all in terms of entertainment, culturally, it's just a terrible split. and that is something we have to repair. >> [inaudible] >> matt flynn, charles koch foundation. when you say that it's something we need to repair, what would you prescribe to be a fix for that? isn't that undermining the idea of spontaneous order? >> no. i think that all order has certain const
responsibility for what happened in my city was comprehensive and inescapable. citizens held the mayor's office accountable for the prosaic tasks of daily life, like trash collection, fixing potholes in the streets, snow removal, but also for executing strategies for the economic and social advancement of the city. in legislative life, by contrast, we are responsible for positions expressed through votes, cosponsorships, interviews and other means. it takes courage to declare dozens or even hundreds of positions and stand for office knowing that with each position, you are displeasing some group of voters. but we do our country a disservice if we mistake the act of taking positions for governance. they are not the same thing. governance requires adaptation to shifting circumstances. it often requires finding common ground with americans who have a different vision than your own. it requires leaders who believe, like edmond burke, that their first responsibility to their constituents is to apply their best judgment. it is possible to be elected and reelected again and again and gain prominence i
has made a request. yes, is it a hefty $60 billion? but look at who was hit -- a big city that's the heart -- one of the heartbeats of america: new york. and a little community like crisfield. now matter h.j. you live in -- but no matter whether you live in new york city or in crisfield, maryland, you deserve the help of your government. and i say to my colleagues, let's think of the people we were sent here to represent. we weren't sent here to represent a bottom line. we were here to represent people. and i would hope that we would put into place -- that we would pass the president's request. we have great policies that were arrived at. and if you really want to honor senator inouye, let's honor the way his own code of conduct -- a gentle way, a civil way, a consensus builder, a bipartisan builder, and a worker to move this bill. senator inouye chaired the full committee on aeption pros these -- on appropriations these last couple of years. his own staff shared a story with me. and it is relative with me here. he said, i chair the defense committee -- subcommittee,ances and t
political power in this city is decided in those saloons. and you can sit up here in your penthouse all you want, but i want to be in the room where the decision is made. i'll take your word "demographic." i don't, and this is where i so deeply disagree with our consulting class and, candidly, with one of the comments of our last nominee. i don't see demographic problems. what do you think asian-americans want? they want a good education for their kids. they're passionate about their children. they love their children. they invest heavily in their children. they invest more heavily in their children than any other ethnic group in america. what kind of future do you think they want? just saw a survey in the morning that came out. guess what the number one validation of achievement as seen by college students is today when you say from them 25-30 years from now how do you know you'll be successful, you know what it is? owning a house. now, if you were a true left-wing collectivist who wanted to herd everybody into apartments so they could be close to the subway so they wouldn't need a car whi
harry truman easeleddest grandson to hiroshima as the city prepared to mark the bombing of the city in 1945. >> you know, everybody has their own view what happened, and i, i don't, i don't want to argue survival with anyone in japan about the history. i think we're past that. my whole purpose for being here is to listen, to honor the dead, to listen to the living and to see -- to do what i can to see this doesn't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us sunday at 9 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> now, a discussion of how the military and national security might be affected by spending cuts scheduled to take effect the first of the year. part of the so-called fiscal cliff. former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, was joined by the chairmen of the senate house armed services committee. this is a little less than an hour. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming. my name is. peter:rerson -- peterson. i want to give you, first, a review of our foundation and why we are supporting the project you're going to hear about today. starting about 30 years ago a
love her. >> for more information on this and other cities on the local content vehicle's tour, go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> now, james gustave speth argues that building a democratic and ec lookically-sustainable economic system will bring about a new wave of prosperity. this program is about an hour, 40. [applause] >> thank you, john, and thank all of you for braving the weather and coming out, and thanks especially to the co-sponsors who joined ips in this and the afl-cio for making in the room available. it's wonderful to see so many people here and so many old friends here. so thank you all very much. i will try to not talk for too long. i have my watch. i didn't have it one time when i was speaking at yale, and i'm delighted to see some of my students from yale here, and i ran over real badly, and i apologized for not having my watch and letting things get out of hand, and students said, that east okay, dean speth, there's a calendar on the wall behind you. [laughter] it's good to be here, also, on the first anniversary of occupy wall street, a momentous event. i want to tell
much time in pennsylvania think of it as a -- a state of big cities and small towns but they may miss the -- the substantial agricultural economy that we have. agribusiness in our state is a $46.4 billion industry. 17.5% of pennsylvanians are employed in the so-called food and fiber system. and one of the questions we have to ask is: what does this all mean? well, i think it certainly means that at least we need a five-year farm bill, not -- not a short-term farm bill. we do too much of that around here on -- on other areas of public policy. we should do what we've always done in the senate long before i got here, passing five-year bills with regard to the farm bill. it does create economic opportunities in rural areas. it sustains the consumers and businesses that rely upon our rural economy. the senate-passed farm bill would reduce the deficit by approximately $23 billion through the elimination of some subsidies, the consolidation of programs, and -- and producing greater efficiencies in the delivery mechanisms in programs. now, we're having a big debate about the end of the year a
of you. now you heard that i didn't grow up in a big city like washington d.c. or baltimore or silver spring's or brockville, alexander or atlanta. i grew up on a farm in rural alabama about 50 miles from montgomery. outside of the little place called troy. my father was a sharecropper and farmer. back in 1844 when i was solely for your souls, my father had saved $300 that the $300 he got a one acre land. and on this pharmacy lot of card and coin, tenets, callous and chickens. on the farm that was my responsibility to care for the chickens. then i fell in love bracing chickens like no one else could raise chickens. can i sue the hands of those who know how to raise chickens? let's have a little fun here this afternoon. [inaudible] placed him under the second handedly for three long weeks for the little chicks to hatch. some of you may be saying john lewis, how are you able to do so emplace them from time to time another hand would get on the same nest and there would be some more eggs. good to carry fresh eggs from the eggs. do you follow me? you don't follow me. it's okay. it's all r
challenging as it may be, holding elections in the major cities and in the northern regions would be this strong guest impossible of mali's sovereignty or territory and steps of rebuilding a democracy. the transition government is government plans and actions to the public and the crisis of legitimacy. the international community needs to harmonize its approach toward the pursuit of the polls that could lead to the legitimately elected government and military actions to detect the north. the contradictory public that take the military option off the table in the short and medium-term may only serve to emboldened the extra hauling them time to reinforce their presence. such also exacerbate fear there may be a conspiracy to breakout and to the civilian space rule out the hand of the pro-democracy forces within the country and for the work that is deeply invested in the space rule. many malians were proud of the country's democracy to consolidating the need by strengthening institutions and enhancing accountability and in the intelligence of the coup it's now been superseded by the c
in a big city like washington d.c. or baltimore or silver springs or rockwell, alexander, atlanta, i grew up on a farm and rural alabama about 50 miles from montgomery. outside a little place called joy. my father was of a tenant farmer . back in 1944 when i was only four years old my father and save $300. he bought 110 acres of land. on this farm there was a lot of cotton and corn, peanuts, hogs, cows, and chickens. on the farm it was my responsibility to care for the chickens. i fell in love with raising chickens like no one else to raise chickens. any of you know anything about raising chickens to mechanize events of those? okay. as a little boy, placed them and waited for three long weeks for the little chicks hatch. some of you may be saying, why do you. [indiscernible] well, from time to time another and would get on that same nest. there would be more eggs. you have to deal to tell the first from the ones that were already under there. that's okay. it's all right. what hatch. take these six. raise them on year-round. just give them to another and. more fresh eggs. when i look back
in this city. and we've been talking with several different authors. and we want to introduce you to another author right now, and it's wendy mcelroy whose book is called "the art of being free: politics versus the every man and woman." wendy mcelroy, first of all, tell us about yourself. >> guest: well, i'm an individualist feminist, i'm an individualist anarchist. i've been active in libertarianism for about 40 years now. i've been writing since i was 15 years old. this book is my reaction to 9/11, basically. when 9/11 happened, i started to rethink everything about libertarianism and everything about my belief system. i wondered had i wasted my life to working freedom for the decades i have because i saw a police state arise so quickly after 9/11. and so effortlessly. it seemed no one resisted it. it seemed that america gave up on freedom all at one moment. and i did a lot of thinking about my relationship to the state, what the state was, how important it was to my life and how the main thing that responsibility of life, if you want, is what henry david thoreau used to call the business
in baltimore -- you have been there many times yourself. you know it is a city known for his row houses, not for its rodeos. kay invited me to come into the rodeo in the astrodome. with i showed up, to her surprise -- well, i showed up, to her surprise. i had little boots on, a cowgirl hat and a vest. she put me in a buckboard and deep in the heart of texas we circled the astrodome together. i was in a buckboard. she was in a pall m palomino neo me. at the end of the evening, i was there munching on barbecue, affectionately called buckboard barb, and that's the kind of thing -- and i have the pictures to show it. they're locked up. i don't widely distribute them much but it was a heck of an evening. i say that because, again, out of that comes great friendships that also lead to smoothing the way, not paving -- actually, not smoothing the way -- paving the way, where we put our heads together to solve our national problems, a understand t and toy where we get the best ideas from a variety of approaches. and at the end of the way, we feel better but america is better off. i'm really -- i
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